Printable Foraging Journal

Foraging Journal

Ever spotted a chestnut tree in the spring only to forget where you saw it when fall finally rolls around? I sure have. And so I decided to create a foraging journal to help me keep track of my finds.

Inside of Foraging Journal

It has a section for each month, and enough room for me to note each find, it’s location, how much I picked, when I picked it and anything else that seems important. Now I have my own month-by-month foraging guide for my area, and a few less things to remember.

Foraging Journal - Various Formats

If you’d like to create your own foraging journal, you’re welcome to use mine. There’s a full-page version, if you prefer a large format, and a half-page version, if you’d like something a bit smaller. You can slide it into a full or half-size binder, fold it and staple it pamphlet style or even bind it. There’s lots of room to customize it to fit your needs. I’ll be using a half-size binder for mine, and I made each of my kids one of the pamphlet versions, complete with a laminated cover.

Half-Page Print Instructions: The pages are designed to print double-sided. If your printer has a built-in duplexing feature (it can be set up to print on both sides of a page). Just select the duplex option and the ‘flip on short edge’ option before you hit print. This will ensure that the pages are properly oriented. If your printer doesn’t do this, or that just sounds too complicated, simply print the odd pages first. Then, reload the paper into your printer (so it’ll print on the blank side); and print the even pages.

Full-Page Print Instructions Just hit print, and you should be good to go. If you’d like a spine for your binder, just print an extra copy of the cover, and cut a strip out to slide into the side of your binder.

If you’re using Google’s Chrome browser, our printables may not print properly. Click here for printing help.

Crabapple Butter Recipe

Crabapple Butter Recipe

Quick somebody make some biscuits. I currently have four jars of crabapple butter in my fridge, and I’m dying to crack one open. The smell. The taste. The color. It’s fall in a jar.

But don’t take my word for it. Make some, and see for yourself. Here’s my recipe. [Read more...]

Crabapple Sauce Recipe

Crabapple Sauce Recipe

We picked five gallons of crabapples the other night. Now I’m busy turning them into tasty things. Like this crabapple sauce. Isn’t the color gorgeous? And the house smelled so good when I was making it. If you have a crabapple tree that you’ve been eyeing, you have to make this recipe at least once. It’s a lot of work – I’m not going to lie – but the end result is pretty spectacular.

Ready to give it a go? Here’s the recipe. [Read more...]

How to Tell When Crabapples are Ripe

Crabapples

I’ve been watching the crabapple trees near our house closely, and it’s almost time to pick them! If you’ve never picked crabapples before, here’s a simple way to tell when they’re ripe and ready! [Read more...]

4 Kitchen Scraps You Shouldn’t Throw Away

Make better use of your kitchen scraps, and you’ll have less trash to take out and fewer groceries to buy. Here are four scraps that are worth hanging on to:

Turkey Broth

Bones – Beef bones, ham bones, chicken bones, turkey bones – they all make beautiful broth. Just throw them in your crockpot with some veggies, herbs and water, and come back later in the day to jar it up.

Vegetable Scraps

Vegggie Scraps – Drop onion, carrot and potato peels, broccoli stems, cabbage cores and carrot tops into a freezer bag, and pop it into the freezer. When the bag is full, use it to make a rich vegetable broth.

How to Make Orange Extract

Citrus Peels – Keep orange and lemon peels for their zests, dry them to add to recipes or use them to create your own extracts.

Bread Crumbs

Bread – Save bread heels, crusts and any stale bread that you may have, and use them to make your own bread crumbs. If you dry your breadcrumbs in the oven, they’ll keep for months.

Are there other kitchen scraps that you keep? I’d love to hear what they are and what you do with them.