DG's frugal journal

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Dgflorida
Posts: 4381
Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2015 8:10 pm

Re: DG's frugal journal

Post by Dgflorida »

Wednesday am

The week has kitchen related stuff every day it seems. This has turned into a fresh fish week. I tried the Mai-mai fresh fish and today, Winn Dixie has fresh salmon on sale. So we will have it tonight. It is good to have it tonight since tomorrow is garbage day and the sooner the skin is gone from the house the better.

The last few days have been posed a problem with inside humidity. The cloudy days have reduced ac, but the constant outside high humidity has raised the humidity inside. Yesterday, we agreed to turn the house temperature down a degree in order to reduce the humidity. It was successful and as a result, the house humidity is under 80%. Still high, but tolerable. The high outside humidity and cloudy days are bad for most garden plants and my FB garden friends are beginning to experience mildew. Some have had to pull plants and just replant. This has started me thinking again about solar power. If I could grow them inside under grow lights a bit longer, I might be able to avoid this kind of difficulty. This is a good thing to ponder. I don't want to go to a whole house solar unit at this time, but explore smaller units until I can understand the principles better. I know of one guy who runs his hydroponics off solar. Amazing, but very time consuming. A bit much for me at this time.

It looks like this will be an opportunity to confront my tendency to save things. I have decided that I will send most of the cleaned pickle jars to recycle. I had been saving them thinking of reuse, but I am finding no reuse for them. This remodel will reduce my available kitchen storage substantially. Time to reduce.

Dgflorida
Posts: 4381
Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2015 8:10 pm

Re: DG's frugal journal

Post by Dgflorida »

Wednesday-thought for the day.

I recently saw a YouTube video of an interview with one of the shark tank investors. She had had a long business relationship with President Trump before he was president. She described him as brilliant. She gave an amazing example of his people skills. I have read one of his books and for sure, he is amazing. He has dropped the unemployment rate to not only historic lows, but lower than most countries worldwide. He has put the economy on steroids actually putting the Chinese economy in the dust. That gives me a pleasure because the Chinese have been stealing US innovations for decades and profiting by theft is wrong. His opponents don't like his style or personality, but can't make an honest argument against his success with the economy. Since I hired him to give us economic freedom, I am happy with him. I am familiar with the face of the enemy through the Cold War time. And I don't want to leave that as a legacy. As a history buff, I see the world through the lens of historic principles and as such, we are in trouble. The Sino-chinese alliance is real and we have squandered our vast resources and American spirit. Of course, short sighted people shout conspiracy theory, but they don't know what I know, but can't talk about.

I recently responded to a newspaper editorial posted on FB by my US representative. I follow him on FB. Everyone should know who they elect to Congress. The subject was on the so called constitutional crisis. I got many likes and even a few loves for my remarks. 2 people challenged my opinion. The first one posted an opinion from a lawyer working for Fox. His position was that it was not illegal under the constitution to have secret hearings. My response was even if you can do something, should you? I then discussed the consequences of such a choice largely based on historical facts. Of course, he had to then personally assault me because he could not construct a logical response. Typical these day. The second tried to turn it onto a personal attack on Donald Trump. I pointed out that the subject was constitutional principles. And he needed to stick to the subject. Another typical baiting technique. Sadly, too many people are so poorly educated these days, emotional outbursts and personal attacks is all they have. It is sad. I am glad I read and study and am a lifetime learner.

Dgflorida
Posts: 4381
Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2015 8:10 pm

Re: DG's frugal journal

Post by Dgflorida »

Saturday am

This kitchen project has shown that I no longer like change. I suspect that the dislike of change will become greater as I age. Still I am glad I am making this change. I dreaded traveling with hubs to see his relatives. Many of whom I really don't like. Never again.

This kitchen project is very expensive. The reason is that it is almost completely custom. It is unfortunate that things for the handicapped is so expensive.

Meanwhile, I have transplanted my little tomato plants to bigger pots. I start my plants in toilet paper cardboard tubes. They really like growing in them and they are easy to transfer. I make the little planting pots by cutting a cardboard tube in half and then folding the ends over to make a bottom. I place them in an egg carton with the egg spot bottoms cut out. I put the top of the egg cartons underneath to catch excess water. The little slits in the top of the egg carton keeps excess water from accumulating as I water the little potting pots. All recycle. All frugal.

I have thought about my solar project and what do I really need. Almost everything in the house requires a lot of power. And so, a battery that I plan to charge with a small solar panel will not do much. This is educational. We are really addicted to power. Wow. But I think I have found some where to start. I complained here about the damp cold winters that have become the norm here in Florida. They lead to late season blight. The kind that was responsible for the potato famine in Ireland. It was the high humidity. As I start my little tomatoes, I began to realize that if I could grow them inside with a grow light, I could reduce the chances of blight. Well, I can run grow lights off my solar battery. What about a green house. Anything outside faces high humidity during that 30 days of dreary damp winter, usually early February these days.

Thinking on it as I plant more seeds to fill a winter garden. Still fighting white flies like everyone else.

gaylejackson2
Posts: 2958
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2015 1:13 pm
Location: Utah

Re: DG's frugal journal

Post by gaylejackson2 »

Dgflorida wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 8:11 am
Saturday am

This kitchen project has shown that I no longer like change. I suspect that the dislike of change will become greater as I age. Still I am glad I am making this change. I dreaded traveling with hubs to see his relatives. Many of whom I really don't like. Never again.

This kitchen project is very expensive. The reason is that it is almost completely custom. It is unfortunate that things for the handicapped is so expensive.

Meanwhile, I have transplanted my little tomato plants to bigger pots. I start my plants in toilet paper cardboard tubes. They really like growing in them and they are easy to transfer. I make the little planting pots by cutting a cardboard tube in half and then folding the ends over to make a bottom. I place them in an egg carton with the egg spot bottoms cut out. I put the top of the egg cartons underneath to catch excess water. The little slits in the top of the egg carton keeps excess water from accumulating as I water the little potting pots. All recycle. All frugal.

I have thought about my solar project and what do I really need. Almost everything in the house requires a lot of power. And so, a battery that I plan to charge with a small solar panel will not do much. This is educational. We are really addicted to power. Wow. But I think I have found some where to start. I complained here about the damp cold winters that have become the norm here in Florida. They lead to late season blight. The kind that was responsible for the potato famine in Ireland. It was the high humidity. As I start my little tomatoes, I began to realize that if I could grow them inside with a grow light, I could reduce the chances of blight. Well, I can run grow lights off my solar battery. What about a green house. Anything outside faces high humidity during that 30 days of dreary damp winter, usually early February these days.

Thinking on it as I plant more seeds to fill a winter garden. Still fighting white flies like everyone else.
Tell me about the white flies please? What do they do?

I enjoy reading your posts because of the information you load them with.

Dgflorida
Posts: 4381
Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2015 8:10 pm

Re: DG's frugal journal

Post by Dgflorida »

Thank you Gayle. White flies. Ugh. White flies are very hard to manage. They are happy to attack any plant, fruit, vegetable, flower, tree, grasses. They are so tiny that screens don't stop them. They carry many bad plant virus and create the perfect environment for leaf molds and mildews. Typical pesticides don't touch them while poisoning the plants for human consumption. Agricultural oils are their enemy. Neem oil is the most often promoted these days. Neem oil is derived from a plant and then the oil of it is usually mixed with other non toxic oils. Oils suffocate the insects by coating their exoskeletons through which they breath. White flies hide on the underside of the leaf, so just spraying from a plane would fail. In cold climates, white flies do not survive the cold, but in warmer climates as more of us are experiencing, they thrive. Mealy bugs are often seen with white flies. Luckily, both are killed by oil. Some think there may be hope for certain companion plants, but doesn't really look that promising right now.

Understanding that sprays are imperfect and these bugs are everywhere has created an interesting situation. Oils must be sprayed when no sun will hit the plant for a long while. Oils must be sprayed when no rain is likely. A bit challenging. I am not spraying most of my plants. Surprisingly, many seem to be overcoming the bugs on their own. It looks like it takes several months before they either die or survive. During that infection, the leaves crumple into tight fists. Then after awhile, new growth will pop out healthy. Sometimes, the flowers are abnormal. Because tomatoes and peppers are fast growers, I have to help them out with oil. The morning glories seem to be a favorite of the while flies, so I will not grow them near my regular garden next year. Passion vine seems unaffected although grown in the same soil. Naturalized vincas are unaffected. Milkweed butterfly seems unaffected too. Learning to grow what survives this changing climate.

gaylejackson2
Posts: 2958
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2015 1:13 pm
Location: Utah

Re: DG's frugal journal

Post by gaylejackson2 »

Dgflorida wrote:
Sat Nov 02, 2019 10:01 am
Thank you Gayle. White flies. Ugh. White flies are very hard to manage. They are happy to attack any plant, fruit, vegetable, flower, tree, grasses. They are so tiny that screens don't stop them. They carry many bad plant virus and create the perfect environment for leaf molds and mildews. Typical pesticides don't touch them while poisoning the plants for human consumption. Agricultural oils are their enemy. Neem oil is the most often promoted these days. Neem oil is derived from a plant and then the oil of it is usually mixed with other non toxic oils. Oils suffocate the insects by coating their exoskeletons through which they breath. White flies hide on the underside of the leaf, so just spraying from a plane would fail. In cold climates, white flies do not survive the cold, but in warmer climates as more of us are experiencing, they thrive. Mealy bugs are often seen with white flies. Luckily, both are killed by oil. Some think there may be hope for certain companion plants, but doesn't really look that promising right now.

Understanding that sprays are imperfect and these bugs are everywhere has created an interesting situation. Oils must be sprayed when no sun will hit the plant for a long while. Oils must be sprayed when no rain is likely. A bit challenging. I am not spraying most of my plants. Surprisingly, many seem to be overcoming the bugs on their own. It looks like it takes several months before they either die or survive. During that infection, the leaves crumple into tight fists. Then after awhile, new growth will pop out healthy. Sometimes, the flowers are abnormal. Because tomatoes and peppers are fast growers, I have to help them out with oil. The morning glories seem to be a favorite of the while flies, so I will not grow them near my regular garden next year. Passion vine seems unaffected although grown in the same soil. Naturalized vincas are unaffected. Milkweed butterfly seems unaffected too. Learning to grow what survives this changing climate.
That is fascinating in a strange way. I remember reading about some of the first vaccines made from unaffected animals, humans, or plants.

Your white flies remind me slightly of squash bugs here; they hide in wood over winter (our woodpile), but won't attack my garden plants IF we applied rotted manure to it either the previous all, or that spring, yet they are not bothered by commercial fertilizers.

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